rosita runs away

Brooke is putting on a play with her friends this Sunday.

A play that she wrote.

Brooke, the child who entered school with no imaginary play.

The child who we were told could not – might not ever – understand the concept of symbolic play.

The one for whom language was and remains a struggle, but for whom scripts have always been second nature.

(Oh, and the one who we were told would neither have nor want friends.)

Last week, she asked to go to the store where they sell blank books. I showed her one. She asked for a package of ten. And then she got to work.

She wrote five stories.

This is one.

The one that formed the script for the play.

I give you Rosita Runs Away.

{Images are the pages of the book, with the text transcribed as it was written below each one.}

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Rosita Runs Away, by Brooke

Back cover:

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 Where is Rosita?

Find her with Alina and friends. Look in the garden. Look up and down.

{Ed Note: I friggin love that she made a back cover describing the book. I mean, right? Right.}

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Rosita is small & blue. Rosita is cute.

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Suddenly, Rosita ran away.

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Along came a little girl named Alina. She had really long golden hair and red boots.

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Up a mountain, but it was Melody. Melody laughed.

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In a tree, but that was Maria. Maria said, I can help. Good, said Alina.

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In a bush, but it was Mary. Mary giggled.

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In the dirt, but it was Terry. She laughed out loud.

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In the flowers. There was Rosita. Her mom arived.

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Alina and Rosita and Mary played together.

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Every one made wishes. Alina wished for a dinosaur.

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Rosita wished for a pet goldfish.

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Maria, Mary & Terry wished for a bird, a drum & a pair of wings.

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Melody wished for a unicorn.

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Their wishes came true. Rosita’s mom smiled.

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Everyone played all day.

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Rosita was found for good.

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Rosita wasn’t lost anymore.

Shared with Brooke’s generous permission, for which I am grateful. 

32 thoughts on “rosita runs away

  1. Brooke has a talent for storytelling, I think. I’ve read books for younger kids (Kindergarden-Grade 1 reading levels) by adults that weren’t nearly as entertaining. Seriously: This would be a huge improvement on a lot of the basic reader books out there – even on the ones written by adults who supposedly make a living at it and so should be good but aren’t.

    Anyway, I figured I’d praise Brooke’s story because it’s better than a lot of the kid lit I have to read to my young relatives when I visit.

  2. I love the artwork. The girls all look so colorful and friendly!

    I’m also laughing to myself while reading this, because I just finished reading a scholarly article that claimed autistic people cannot possibly appreciate literature, because our so-called “lack of theory of mind” means we can’t keep track of what each character wants or knows or thinks. And then I read Brooke’s story, which so beautifully demonstrates mastery of that exact concept.

    Sorry, “experts,” but WE CAN TOO!

    • I dont get why there are always people trying to put limits on what autistic people can and cant do (or people in general.) Everyone is different, and I believe that anything a regular person can do, an autistic person can probably do too. It all comes down to how your heart is in it 🙂

    • I dont get why there are always people trying to put limits on what autistic people can and cant do (or people in general.) Everyone is different, and I believe that anything a regular person can do, an autistic person can probably do too. It all comes down to how your heart is in it 🙂

  3. Jess; I have many hats, all of which LOVE your blog. I am a mom of an 11 ;year old boy with HFA (used to be Aspergers), ADHD, and anxiety. I am also an OT in the school system. Both of those roles have benefited from your insight and advocacy for our children and adults with ASD. I am thinking about writing a paper to talk about the definition of Play skills and how it is a culturally limited assessment, that we need to broaden how we talk about play to include the methods used by people on the spectrum in play. Any thoughts (I hope this is clear enough, but wanted to keep it short). I just hate as a professional and mom when people who say “has poor play skills.” Well wrong…..

  4. You and yours must be ready to explode with pride and joy. She is a “pride and joy” as everyone’s child is (or has the right to be)! Fantastic story, fabulously illustrated and expertly told. Thank you, Brooke, for sharing.

  5. Good luck, beautiful Brooke & friends! 10:20am, Sunday morning for me. Sat here with a cup of tea and zero plans for the day ahead – wishing I could be part of the audience watching, waiting for Rosita’s happy ending 🙂 x

  6. I’m struck by the fact that the kids’ eyes changed when they were making their wishes – “typical” eyes open pictures when they’re playing, and then the “eyes squeezed shut” when they’re wishing. Well done!
    Presume competence…’cause obviously it’s there! ❤

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