Tagged with imagination

rosita runs away

rosita runs away

Brooke is putting on a play with her friends this Sunday. A play that she wrote. Brooke, the child who entered school with no imaginary play. The child who we were told could not – might not ever – understand the concept of symbolic play. The one for whom language was and remains a struggle, but for … Continue reading

play date

play date

{image is the cover of the book, Rosita Runs Away, written and illustrated by Brooke.} – “When’s my play gonna be?” she asked for the hundredth time that day. I didn’t want to admit it, wouldn’t have admitted it, but I was putting off writing the email. I’d tried to convince her to reconsider her … Continue reading

all of me

all of me

‘Ah, music, he said, wiping his eyes. A magic beyond all we do here!’ – JK Rowling, Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone – Last night … We had been in space. The rocket bed was headed to Mars. The stuffed animal astronauts were all in their pajama space suits. The room was completely dark, except for the Dora flashlight … Continue reading

facilitation

Rocket Ship Headed to Mars, Brooke 2013 Facilitate (fa-cil-i-tate) / fəˈsiliˌtāt/ verb (used with object) Definition: to make easier or less difficult; help forward (an action, a process, etc.); make possible; make smooth / smoother; smooth the way for Synonyms: enable, assist, help (along), oil the wheels of, expedite, accelerate, forward, advance, promote, further, encourage, … Continue reading

pretend play

 ~ Children on the autism spectrum lack the ability to engage in pretend play. Got it? Don’t forget that, ok? It’s important. We’ll come back to in a minute. But first, how about a few pictures from Sunday night dinner? Ashley is thirsty. I’ll give her some Diet Coke. (No, it’s not Diet Coke. No, … Continue reading

pretend

“I am neither an optimist nor pessimist, but a possibilist.” – Max Lerner * * “Child has no discernible play skills.”   ~ Neuropsychologist #1 * * “She came to us with absolutely no functional play skills.” ~ Integrated preschool teacher * * “Child presents with a marked lack of joint attention. There is no attempt … Continue reading